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Click on the phrases to see them in context. The original texts by Immanuel Kant and David Hume are available from the Gutenberg Projet.

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Experience is itself a synthesis of perceptions; and it employs perceptions to increment the conception, which I obtain by means of another perception.

 The empirical reality of time, therefore, remains, as the condition of all our experience. In one word, this transcendental thing is merely the schema of a regulative principle, by means of which Reason, so far as in her lies, extends the dominion of systematic unity over the whole sphere of experience. A transcendental proposition is, therefore, a synthetical cognition of reason by means of pure conceptions and the discursive method, and it renders possible all synthetical unity in empirical cognition, though it cannot present us with any intuition a priorI. [*Footnote; In the case of the conception of cause, I do really go beyond the empirical conception of an event--but not to the intuition which presents this conception in concreto, but only to the time-conditions, which may be found in experience to correspond to the conception. Suppose that each of these objects separately produces a passion; and that these two passions are in themselves contrary: We find from experience, that the want of relation in the objects or ideas hinders the natural contrariety of the passions, and that the break in the transition of the thought removes the affections from each other, and prevents their opposition. He who would derive from experience the conceptions of virtue, who would make (as many have really done) that, which at best can but serve as an imperfectly illustrative example, a model for or the formation of a perfectly adequate idea on the subject, would in fact transform virtue into a nonentity changeable according to time and circumstance and utterly incapable of being employed as a rule. This law of specification cannot be deduced from experience; it can never present us with a principle of so universal an application. For that is plainly of itself some degree of probability; though uncertain and variable, according to the degrees of his experience and length of the accompt. For they are tantamount to asking whether all things as phenomena do without exception belong to the complex and connected whole of a single experience, of which every given perception is a part which therefore cannot be conjoined with any other phenomena--or, whether my perceptions can belong to more than one possible experience? But reason, in her endeavours to arrive by a priori means at some true statement concerning objects and to extend cognition beyond the bounds of possible experience, is altogether dialectic, and her illusory assertions cannot be constructed into a canon such as an analytic ought to contain.