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Click on the phrases to see them in context. The original texts by Immanuel Kant and David Hume are available from the Gutenberg Projet.

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It is a matter of indifference, whether I say, "I may in the progress of experience discover stars, at a hundred times greater distance than the most distant of those now visible," or, "Stars at this distance may be met in space, although no one has, or ever will discover them." For, if they are given as things in themselves, without any relation to possible experience, they are for me non-existent, consequently, are not objects, for they are not contained in the regressive series of experience.

 The conception of a cubic foot of space, however I may think it, is in itself completely identical. 3. On this necessity a priori is also founded the possibility of apodeictic principles of the relations of time, or axioms of time in general, such as; "Time has only one dimension," "Different times are not coexistent but successive" (as different spaces are not successive but coexistent). That space and time are only forms of sensible intuition, and hence are only conditions of the existence of things as phenomena; that, moreover, we have no conceptions of the understanding, and, consequently, no elements for the cognition of things, except in so far as a corresponding intuition can be given to these conceptions; that, accordingly, we can have no cognition of an object, as a thing in itself, but only as an object of sensible intuition, that is, as phenomenon--all this is proved in the analytical part of the Critique; and from this the limitation of all possible speculative cognition to the mere objects of experience, follows as a necessary result. But though every great distance produces an admiration for the distant object, a distance in time has a more considerable effect than that in space. Phenomena as objects of perception are not pure, that is, merely formal intuitions, like space and time, for they cannot be perceived in themselves. It follows that this must hold good of all things that are in the different parts of space at the same time, however similar and equal one may be to another.