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Cliquer sur les phrases pour les voir dans leur contexte. Les textes de Immanuel Kant et David Hume sont disponibles auprès du Projet Gutenberg.

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For, in the present case, the condition stands out of and beyond the series of phenomena--it is intelligible, and it consequently cannot be subjected to any sensuous condition, or to any time-determination by a preceding cause.

 The intelligible object of these transcendent ideas may be conceded, as a transcendental object. How else can we account for the inextinguishable desire in the human mind to find a firm footing in some region beyond the limits of the world of experience? But as in general the passions are more violent than the emotions arising from beauty and deformity, these impressions have been commonly distinguished from each other. There is another phaenomenon of a like nature with the foregoing, viz, the superior effects of the same distance in futurity above that in the past. If this Critique itself does not assume the title of transcendental philosophy, it is only because, to be a complete system, it ought to contain a full analysis of all human knowledge a priorI. Our critique must, indeed, lay before us a complete enumeration of all the radical conceptions which constitute the said pure knowledge. *Lost A Security Deposit? Having therefore found, that time in its first appearance to the mind is always conjoined with a succession of changeable objects, and that otherwise it can never fall under our notice, we must now examine whether it can be conceived without our conceiving any succession of objects, and whether it can alone form a distinct idea in the imagination. We may add to this a remark; that in matters of religion men take a pleasure in being terrifyed, and that no preachers are so popular, as those who excite the most dismal and gloomy passions. Whether reason is not itself, in the actual delivery of these laws, determined in its turn by other influences, and whether the action which, in relation to sensuous impulses, we call free, may not, in relation to higher and more remote operative causes, really form a part of nature--these are questions which do not here concern us.